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Demon Possession

If you want to read a good book on Demon Possession, this is hands down the most thorough and sound book I know of. It is the result of a symposium on the subject, with contributing chapters from a range of well-educated scholars, edited by John Warwick Montgomery. You’ll walk away from this book with a widespread knowledge and exposure to a host of issues associated with Demon Possession including but not limited to: psychology, psychosis, paranormal studies, medical analysis, philosophical probability, historical perspective, theological and biblical data and numerous case documentations. Below is a brief excerpt summary from the book.

- Pastor Duane


 

Satan is the author of all that is destructive. The Christian's heritage is to be in the process of becoming whole, being conformed into the image of CHrist. At what point in sin or suffering one crosses some line where he is now under demonic influence that can be relieved only by a special ministry of deliverance is very unclear. The Hippocratic injunction for physicians to do no harm should be considered very carefully by those who are engaged in deliverance. There is no doubt in my mind that Christians in the mental health field need to become more aware of the fact that we do fight a spiritual warfare and specific prayers for deliverance are in order in certain cases. However, it may well be that a person who confesses and repents of sin, who places himself under the lordship of Jesus Christ, praying for healing with prayer support from a Christian group, blocks demonic activity without even being aware of it. ONe thing is certain: We have an enemy who is a liar, deceiver, destroyer; but we have the victory in Jesus Christ, the God of Scripture.

Excerpt from Demon Possession by John Warwick Montgomery

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A Jesus Who is Strong
Sermon Discussion
Luke 11:14-26

Read the passage to refresh your memory.

-What is strength? When you think of someone who is strong, who comes to mind? Why? Why are we drawn to strength?

I. Superior Power
-In the passage we see that Jesus casts out a demon. How is He able to do that?
-What does Jesus' actions against the demon teach us about His view of evil and how we as His followers are to view it?
-How is Jesus' ways of casting out demons different/superior than those of the day?
-What are things in our culture that we view as evil today? How does the gospel help us to respond to it?
-Where do you need Jesus power in your life today?

II. Superior Logic
-Jesus has supreme logic and demonstrates that in how He responds to the crowd. He demonstrates all knowledge, being an attribute of the Divine. How does it make you feel to know that Jesus knows every thought before we ever think it?
-Why is it a comfort that Jesus, the Supreme Power, knows all things and knows all things in our life?
-Jesus cares about how we think, as well as how we live. How can Jesus transform our minds and thinking?

III. Superior Grace
-Jesus really desires that people hear His message and respond to it by faith. When we receive His message, we are given the Holy Spirit who makes our soul His home and we abide in Him.
-Jesus gathers and longs to gather us unto Himself, safe in His arms. What do you look to in your life to make you feel safe? Why is Jesus better than that?
-Where do you need Jesus' strong arms if grace in your life today?

IV. Pray for one another!

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The Prayer of Prayers

Tim Keller

The Danger of Familiarity
The Lord’s Prayer may be the single set of words spoken more often than any other in the history of the world. Jesus Christ gave it to us as the key to unlock all the riches of prayer. Yet it is an untapped resource, partially because it is so very familiar.

Imagine you are, for the first time, visiting someone who has a home or an apartment near train tracks. You are sitting there in conversation, when suddenly the train comes roaring by, just a few feet from where you are sitting, and you jump to your feet in alarm. “What’s that?” you cry. Your friend, the resident of the house, responds, “What was what?” You answer, “That sound! I thought something was coming through the wall.” “Oh, that,” she says. “That’s just the train. You know, I guess I’ve gotten so used to it that I don’t even notice it anymore.” With wide eyes you say, “I don’t see how that is possible.” But it is.

It is the same with the Lord’s Prayer. The whole world is starving for spiritual experience, and Jesus gives us the means to it in a few words. Jesus is saying, as it were, “Wouldn’t you like to be able to come face-to-face with the Father and king of the universe every day, to pour out your heart to him, and to sense him listening to and listening to and loving you?” We say, of course, yes. Jesus responds, “It’s all in the Lord’s Prayer,” and we say, “In the what?” It’s so familiar we can no longer hear it. Yet everything we need is within it. How do we overcome the deadly peril of familiarity? One of the best ways is to listen to these three great mentors, who plumbed the depths of the prayer through years of reflection and practice. What did they believe the Lord’s Prayer to be saying?

“Our Father Who Art in Heaven”
This is called the address, not actually one of the petitions. Calvin explains that to call God “Father” is to pray in Jesus’ name. “Who would break forth into such rashness as to claim for himself the honor of a son of God unless we had been adopted as children of grace in Christ?” Luther also believed the address was a call to not plunge right into talking to God but to first recollect our situation and realize our standing in Christ before we proceed into prayer. We are to say to God, “You have taught us to regard you and call upon you as one Father of us all . . . although . . . you could rightly and properly be a severe judge over us.” Therefore, we should start by asking God to “implant in our hearts a comforting trust in your fatherly love.” Calvin agrees that “by the great sweetness of this name [Father] he frees us from all distrust.”

“Hallowed Be Thy Name”
This first petition is somewhat opaque to contemporary English speakers. One reason is that the word hallowed is seldom used today, and another is that the idea of holiness (the basic meaning of the older English word hallowed) is alien in our secularized society. The third is a seeming problem of logic, expressed by Luther. “What are we praying for when we ask that His name become holy? Is it not holy already?” He immediately answers that of course it is holy, but that “in our use of it his name is not kept holy.” Luther points to the fact that all baptized Christians have God’s name put upon them. As name bearers they represent a good and holy God, and so we are praying that God keep us from dishonoring the name by which we are called, that he would empower us to become ourselves good and holy. This petition, however, has a second meaning for Luther, who joins Augustine when he says it is a prayer that God “be glorified among all nations as you are glorified among us.” It is a request that faith in God would spread throughout the world, that Christians would honor God with the Christ-likeness or holiness of their lives, and that more and more people would honor God and call on his name.

Calvin agrees but adds a thought that goes deep into the heart. “What is more unworthy than for God’s glory to be obscured partly by our ungratefulness?” In other words, ingratitude and an indifferent attitude toward God fails to honor his name. To “hallow” God’s name is not merely to live righteous lives but to have a heart of grateful joy toward God—and even more, a wondrous sense of his beauty. We do not revere his name unless he “captivate[s] us with wonderment for him.”

“Thy Kingdom Come”
Augustine says God is reigning now, but just as a light is absent to those refusing to open their eyes, so it is possible to refuse God’s rule. This is the cause of all our human problems, since we were created to serve him, and when we serve other things in God’s place, all spiritual, psychological, cultural, and even material problems ensue. Therefore, we need his kingdom to “come.” Calvin believed there were two ways God’s kingdom comes—through the Spirit, who “corrects our desires,” and through the Word of God, which “shapes our thoughts.” This, then, is a “Lordship” petition: It is asking God to extend his royal power over every part of our lives—emotions, desires, thoughts, and commitments. It is reminiscent of Thomas Cranmer’s “collect” for the fourteenth Sunday after Trinity, “that we may obtain that which thou dost promise, make us to love that which thou dost command.” We are asking God to so fully rule us that we want to obey him with all our hearts and with joy. Luther adds also an outward and a future dimension. The reign of God on earth is only partial now, but the fullness of the future kingdom is unimaginable. All suffering, injustice, poverty, and death will be ended. To pray “thy kingdom come” is to “yearn for that future life” of justice and peace, and to ask that “your future kingdom may be the end and consummation of the kingdom you have begun in us.”

“Thy Will Be Done”
Luther is the most vivid and forthright about the meaning of the third petition. He paraphrases like this: “Grant us grace to bear willingly all sorts of sickness, poverty, disgrace, suffering, and adversity and to recognize that in this your divine will is crucifying our will.” We may be reticent to make such a bold statement, but now we can discern the importance of the initial address. Unless we are profoundly certain God is our Father, we will never be able to say “thy will be done.” Fathers are often inscrutable to little children. A four-year-old cannot understand many of his father’s prohibitions—but he trusts him. Only if we trust God as Father can we ask for grace to bear our troubles with patience and grace. Well, someone asks, how can we be sure God is trustworthy? The answer is that this is the one part of the Lord’s Prayer Jesus himself prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane, under circumstances far more crushing than any of us will ever face. He submitted to his Father’s will rather than following his own desires, and it saved us. That’s why we can trust him. Jesus is not asking us to do anything for him that he hasn’t already done for us, under conditions of difficulty beyond our comprehension. Luther adds, following Augustine, that without this trust in God, we will try to take God’s place and seek revenge on those who have harmed us. We will be protected “from the horrible vices of character assassination, slander, backbiting . . . condemning others” only if we learn to commit ourselves to God. If we can’t say “thy will be done” from the bottom of our hearts, we will never know any peace. We will feel compelled to try to control people and control our environment and make things the way we believe they ought to be. Yet to control life like this is beyond our abilities, and we will just dash ourselves upon the rocks. This is why Calvin adds that to pray “thy will be done” is to submit not only our wills to God but even our

Well, someone asks, how can we be sure God is trustworthy? The answer is that this is the one part of the Lord’s Prayer Jesus himself prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane, under circumstances far more crushing than any of us will ever face. He submitted to his Father’s will rather than following his own desires, and it saved us. That’s why we can trust him. Jesus is not asking us to do anything for him that he hasn’t already done for us, under conditions of difficulty beyond our comprehension. Luther adds, following Augustine, that without this trust in God, we will try to take God’s place and seek revenge on those who have harmed us. We will be protected “from the horrible vices of character assassination, slander, backbiting . . . condemning others” only if we learn to commit ourselves to God. If we can’t say “thy will be done” from the bottom of our hearts, we will never know any peace. We will feel compelled to try to control people and control our environment and make things the way we believe they ought to be. Yet to control life like this is beyond our abilities, and we will just dash ourselves upon the rocks. This is why Calvin adds that to pray “thy will be done” is to submit not only our wills to God but even our

Luther adds, following Augustine, that without this trust in God, we will try to take God’s place and seek revenge on those who have harmed us. We will be protected “from the horrible vices of character assassination, slander, backbiting . . . condemning others” only if we learn to commit ourselves to God. If we can’t say “thy will be done” from the bottom of our hearts, we will never know any peace. We will feel compelled to try to control people and control our environment and make things the way we believe they ought to be. Yet to control life like this is beyond our abilities, and we will just dash ourselves upon the rocks. This is why Calvin adds that to pray “thy will be done” is to submit not only our wills to God but even our feelings, so that we do not become despondent, bitter, and hardened by the things that befall us. We have considered the first three petitions of the Lord’s Prayer. All our teachers observe the significance of their place in the order—that these petitions come first in prayer. The beginning of prayer is all about God. We are not to let our own needs and issues dominate prayer; rather, we are to give pride of place to praising and honoring him, to yearning to see his greatness and to see it acknowledged everywhere, and to aspiring to full love and obedience. George Herbert expressed it with beautiful economy:

For my heart’s desire
Unto Thine is bent:
I aspire
To a full consent.

Adoration and thanksgiving—God-centeredness—comes first, because it heals the heart of its self-centeredness, which curves us in on ourselves and distorts all our vision. Now that the prayer is nearly half over, and our vision is reframed and clarified by the greatness of God, we can turn to our own needs and those of the world.

“Give Us This Day Our Daily Bread”
Augustine reminds us that “daily bread” is a metaphor for necessities rather than luxuries. Since we have just spent the first three petitions of prayer recognizing God as our true food, wealth, and happiness, Jesus is charging us to now bring our “prayer list” of needs into line with this new frame of heart. As we have seen, Augustine believes the full petition should be Proverbs 30: 8, “Give me neither poverty (lest I resent you) or riches (lest I forget you).” Calvin follows Augustine’s reasoning when he says that, in speaking of our daily bread, “we do not . . . bid farewell to God’s glory . . . [but we] ask only what is expedient for him.” We come with our needs expectant of positive response, but we do so changed by our satisfaction in him and our trust of him. We do not come arrogantly and anxiously telling him what has to happen. Many things we would have otherwise agonized over, we can now ask for without desperation.

Luther sees a social dimension to this prayer as well. For all to get daily bread, there must be a thriving economy, good employment, and a just society. Therefore, to pray “give us—all the people of our land—daily bread” is to pray against “wanton exploitation” in business, trade, and labor, which “crushes the poor and deprives them of their daily bread.” Ominously he warns those who do injustice about the power of this petition. “Let them beware of . . . the intercession of the church, and let them take care that this petition of the Lord’s Prayer does not turn against them.” For Luther, then, to pray for our daily bread is to pray for a prosperous and just social order.

“Forgive Us Our Debts as We Forgive Our Debtors”
The fifth petition concerns our relationships, both with God and others. Luther, who for years struggled mightily and personally with the issues of guilt and pardon, gives a clarion call to seek God’s forgiveness every day in prayer:

If anyone insists on his own goodness and despises others . . . let him look into himself when this petition confronts him. He will find he is no better than others and that in the presence of God everyone must duck his head and come into the joy of forgiveness only through the low door of humility.

Luther adds that this petition is not only a challenge to our pride but a test of spiritual reality. If we find confession and repentance intolerably traumatic or demeaning, it means “the heart is not right with God and cannot draw . . . confidence from his Gospel.” If regular confession does not produce an increased confidence and joy in your life, then you do not understand the salvation by grace, the essence of the faith.

Jesus tightly links our relationship with God to our relationship with others. It works two ways. If we have not seen our sin and sought radical forgiveness from God, we will be unable to forgive and to seek the good of those who have wronged us. So unresolved bitterness is a sign that we are not right with God. It also means that if we are holding a grudge, we should see the hypocrisy of seeking forgiveness from God for sins of our own. Calvin puts it vividly:

If we retain feelings of hatred in our hearts, if we plot revenge and ponder any occasion to cause harm, and even if we do not try to get back into our enemies’ good graces, by every sort of good office deserve well of them, and commend ourselves to them, by this prayer we entreat God not to forgive our sins.

“Lead Us Not into Temptation”
With this petition Augustine makes an important distinction. He says, “The prayer is not that we should not be tempted, but that we should not be brought [or led] into temptation.” Temptation in the sense of being tried and tested is not only inevitable but desirable. The Bible talks of suffering and difficulty as a furnace in which many impurities of soul are “burned off” and we come to greater self-knowledge, humility, durability, faith, and love. However, to “enter into temptation,” as Jesus termed it (Matt 26: 41), is to entertain and consider the prospect of giving in to sin. Calvin lists two categories of temptations from the “right” and from the “left.” From the right comes “riches, power, and honors,” which tempt us into the sin of thinking we do not need God. From the left comes “poverty, disgrace, contempt, and afflictions,” which tempt us to despair, to lose all hope, and to become angrily estranged from God. Both prosperity and adversity, then, are sore tests, and each one brings its own set of enticements away from trusting in God and toward centering your life on yourself and on “inordinate desires" for other things.

“Deliver Us from Evil”
Calvin combined this phrase with “lead us not into temptation” and called it the sixth and last petition. Augustine and Luther, however, viewed “deliver us from evil” as a separate, seventh petition. It can also be translated “deliver us from the Evil One,” that is, the devil. Luther writes that this petition is “directed against specific evils that emanate from the devil’s kingdom . . . poverty, dishonor, death, in short . . . everything that threatens our bodily welfare.” Augustine indicates that while the sixth petition is for deliverance from the remaining evil inside us, this seventh petition is for protection from evil outside us, from malignant forces in the world, especially our enemies who wish to do us harm.

“For Thine Is the Kingdom, the Power, and the Glory Forever”
Finally, there is what is called the ascription: “For thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, forever. Amen.” Augustine does not mention it because it was not in most earlier manuscripts of the Bible or in the Latin Vulgate. Luther does not treat it. However, Calvin, while noting that “this is not extant in the Latin versions,” believes that “it is so appropriate to this place that it ought not to be omitted.” After descending into our needs, troubles, and limitations, we return to the truth of God’s complete sufficiency. Here our hearts can end with “tranquil repose” in the remembrance that nothing can ever snatch away the kingdom, power, and glory from our heavenly, loving Father.

“Give, Forgive, and Deliver—Us”
The concluding remarks on the Lord’s Prayer by John Calvin are especially helpful. Like Luther in A Simple Way to Pray, Calvin insists that the Lord’s Prayer does not bind us to its particular form of words but rather to its content and basic pattern. Indeed, even Luke does not set down Jesus’ teaching on prayer in exactly the same words. The Lord’s Prayer is a summary of all other prayers, providing essential guidance on emphasis and topics, on purpose and even spirit. Therefore in our prayers, “the words may be utterly different, yet the sense ought not to vary.” The Lord’s Prayer must stamp itself on our prayers, shaping them all the way down. There could be no better way to ensure that than Luther’s twice-daily exercise of paraphrasing and personalizing the Lord’s Prayer as introduction to more free-form praise and petition. An equally important insight is a reminder that the Lord’s Prayer was given to us in plural form. We ask God to give us what we need, meaning that, as much as possible, “the prayers of Christians ought to be public . . . to the advancement of the believer’s fellowship.” American theologian Michael S. Horton has pointed out that Calvin believed “public ministry shapes private devotion, not vice versa.” Calvin took great care to define public prayers and the liturgy because he wanted private prayers to be strongly shaped by the corporate worship of the Christian church. Prayer is therefore not a strictly private thing. As much as we can, we should pray with others both formally in gathered worship and informally. Why? If the substance of prayer is to continue a conversation with God, and if the purpose of it is to know God better, then this can happen best in

An equally important insight is a reminder that the Lord’s Prayer was given to us in plural form. We ask God to give us what we need, meaning that, as much as possible, “the prayers of Christians ought to be public . . . to the advancement of the believer’s fellowship.” American theologian Michael S. Horton has pointed out that Calvin believed “public ministry shapes private devotion, not vice versa.” Calvin took great care to define public prayers and the liturgy because he wanted private prayers to be strongly shaped by the corporate worship of the Christian church.

Prayer is therefore not a strictly private thing. As much as we can, we should pray with others both formally in gathered worship and informally. Why? If the substance of prayer is to continue a conversation with God, and if the purpose of it is to know God better, then this can happen best in community. C. S. Lewis argues that it takes a community of people to get to know an individual person. Reflecting on his own friendships, he observed that some aspects of one of his friend’s personality were brought out only through interaction with a second friend. That meant if he lost the second friend, he lost the part of his first friend that was otherwise invisible. “By myself I am not large enough to call the whole man into activity; I want other lights than my own to show all his facets.” If it takes a community to know an ordinary human being, how much more necessary would it be to get to know Jesus alongside others? By praying with friends, you will be able to hear and see facets of Jesus that you have not yet perceived.

That is why, Lewis thinks, that the angels in Isaiah 6 are crying, “Holy, Holy, Holy” to one another. Each angel is communicating to all the rest the part of the glory it sees. Knowing the Lord is communal and cumulative, we must pray and praise together. That way “the more we share the Heavenly Bread between us, the more we shall all have.”

 

This blog is taken from Chapter 8 of Tim Keller's Prayer: Experiencing Awe & Intimacy with God and is one of our favorite books on this subject!

 

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A Jesus Who Listens To Us - Luke 11:1-13
Sermon Discussion

Last week Pastor Duane talked to us about Mary and Martha and choosing to listen to Jesus. This week Duane flipped the conversation to talk about Jesus listening to us. Through prayer that is exactly what happens!

What are some things that make a good listener? Would you say you're a good listener?


Let's read the passage:

1 Now Jesus was praying in a certain place, and when he finished, one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.” 2 And he said to them, “When you pray, say:

“Father, hallowed be your name.
Your kingdom come.
3 Give us each day our daily bread,
4 and forgive us our sins,
for we ourselves forgive everyone who is indebted to us.
And lead us not into temptation.”

5 And he said to them, “Which of you who has a friend will go to him at midnight and say to him, ‘Friend, lend me three loaves, 6 for a friend of mine has arrived on a journey, and I have nothing to set before him’; 7 and he will answer from within, ‘Do not bother me; the door is now shut, and my children are with me in bed. I cannot get up and give you anything’? 8 I tell you, though he will not get up and give him anything because he is his friend, yet because of his impudence he will rise and give him whatever he needs. 9 And I tell you, ask, and it will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be opened to you. 10 For everyone who asks receives, and the one who seeks finds, and to the one who knocks it will be opened. 11 What father among you, if his son asks for a fish, will instead of a fish give him a serpent; 12 or if he asks for an egg, will give him a scorpion? 13 If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will the heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!” -- Luke 11:1-13

Before we get into the sermon, did anything interesting, confusing, or challenging pop out to you in the passage?

Pastor Duane pulled 3 things to we can talk about from the passage:

Learning to pray
Learning to honor
Learning to receive

LEARNING TO PRAY (v 1-4)

The disciples see Jesus praying and ask him to teach them to pray. Jesus then lays out The Lord's Prayer to model how to talk to God.
Duane pointed out that the disciples first had to realize they were not good at praying and could improve before deciding to ask Jesus to teach them.

How does prayer get improved? How have you seen yourself get better at praying?

The Lord's Prayer can be analyzed and studied in many different ways, Duane provided some helpful handholds by highlighting 6 parts or emphases.

"Father": Jesus begins by greeting God using one of His names. There are many names for God throughout the Bible, "IAM", "Jehovah", "Adonai", "Yahweh", etc.

How do you greet God when you pray to him? What would make you try a different greeting?


"Hollowed be thy name": Jesus includes this to emphasize perspective; so we remember it's not just a meditation or some flippant conversation.

What separates prayer from meditation? Can you have a casual prayer with God?


"Your kingdom come": a reminder that God is king and to be on the lookout for tastes of the kingdom now in this broken world.

What are some examples of "tastes" of God's kingdom you've seen recently?


"Give us each day our daily bread": every day we should be talking to God, and seeing Him as provider.

What does it mean that God is our daily provider?

"Forgive us our sins as we forgive those who have sinned against us":Duane pointed out that for forgiveness is the currency of the spiritual life. A life that based on doing everything right all the time will wear you out. Prayer itself, allowing us to talk to God is because of God's grace.

How would you explain this idea that "forgiveness is the currency of the spiritual life" to a friend or neighbor?

"Lead us not Into temptation": Reminder that there is a tempter, and a spiritual battle happening.

What are somethings we can do as a Community Group to encourage one other in resisting temptation?

LEARNING TO HONOR (v 5-8)


Jesus share a quick story to show that God cares about honoring His name. He often acts throughout the Bible to glorify His own name. In prayer we also have the opportunity to honor His name.

Why does God care about His name being honored?


Prayer means a lot. And praying with others, out loud can be a great tool for sharing what we believe about God with unbelievers and believers.

Do you ever pray out loud? How is it different than silent prayers?

 

LEARNING TO RECEIVE(v 9-13)


Jesus again emphasizes God's place as Father. Provider and Protector of His children. Duane talked a bit about seeking God, and how there are 2 types of seekers: those with honest questions who are researching those that went before and want to learn, and those that already have a decision made and are just looking for confirmation in that decision.

How does God protect his children?


When Pray to God, how can you know which kind of seeker you are going to Him as?


PRAYER


Pray as a group and honor God's name by calling on him to bring His kingdom soon, provide for us, and keep us from temptation

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Shootings, hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, cancer…  These kinds of evil are not God's vision for the world. Neither nature itself nor the human person are built to handle such things. So, when a tragic event occurs, what is the Bible's response to how we are to respond?

by Pastor Duane Smets

We Grieve

The Bible instructs us to “weep with those who weep (Romans 12:15).”  The God of a Bible is a God of compassion (Exodus 34:6) who grieves with us and for us (Genesis 6:6; Ephesians 4:30) at things which are an affront to His loving character and vision of a world without sin, sorrow or suffering.  We are compassionate and grieve with others because our God does.

We Help 

Everything we have is a gift of God (James 1:17) and are resources to spread His generosity and love.  We are to help others with the resources we have (Titus 3:14) “when it is in our power to do so (Proverbs 3:27).” One of the greatest resources we have to give is the comfort of God.  As 2 Corinthians 1:4 in the Bible says, “God comforts us in all our affliction, so that we may be able to comfort those who are in any affliction, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God.”  We help with God’s comfort and any other resources we can.

We Pray

The Lord Jesus instructed us to pray and ask God for “His kingdom to come and His will to be done on earth as it is in heaven (Matthew 6:10).”  Jesus promised that in this world we will have  trouble (John 16:33) but He promised to return, make all things new and abolish sin, sorrow and suffering forevermore (2 Peter 3:13, Revelation 21:4-5). Until then we are to pray for the afflicted (James 5:13) and pray for that day (1 Thesalonians 5:1-22).  We pray “Come, Lord Jesus (Revelation 22:20).”

We Long

The story of the Bible tells us all tragedies are a the result of living in a world that has been broken ever since sin and rebellion first entered into it (Genesis 3:1-24).  This brokenness has had and continues to have catastrophic effects both in nature and in human hearts (Romans 8:20-21).  History has proven no political government or laws of the land can change the human heart.  Thus, our hope in not in societal evolution but in Jesus’ return as the eternal and righteous King.    We long and “wait for our blessed hope, the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior Jesus Christ (Titus 2:13).”

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The Case For Conversation

I’d really encourage you to take a minute and read this brief excerpt from Sherry Turkle on the importance of having healthy human conversation.


Why a book on conversation? We’re talking all the time. We text and post and chat. We may even begin to feel more at home in the world of our screens. Among family and friends, among colleagues and lovers, we turn to our phones instead of each other. We readily admit we would rather send an electronic message or mail than commit to a face-to-face meeting or a telephone call. This new mediated life has gotten us into trouble. Face-to-face conversation is the most human—and humanizing—thing we do. Fully present to one another, we learn to listen. It’s where we develop the capacity for empathy. It’s where we experience the joy of being heard, of being understood. And conversation advances self-reflection, the conversations with ourselves that are the cornerstone of early development and continue throughout life. But these days we find ways around conversation. We hide from each other even as we’re constantly connected to each other. For on our screens, we are tempted to present ourselves as we would like to be. Of course, performance is part of any meeting, anywhere, but online and at our leisure, it is easy to compose, edit, and improve as we revise. We say we turn to our phones when we’re “bored.” And we often find ourselves bored because we have become accustomed to a constant feed of connection, information, and entertainment. We are forever elsewhere. At class or at church or business meetings, we pay attention to what interests us and then when it doesn’t, we look to our devices to find something that does. There is now a word in the dictionary called “phubbing.” It means maintaining eye contact while texting. My students tell me they do it all the time and that it’s not that hard. We begin to think of ourselves as a tribe of one, loyal to our own party. We check our messages during a quiet moment or when the pull of the online world simply feels irresistible. Even children text each other rather than talk face-to-face with friends—or, for that matter, rather than daydream, where they can take time alone with their thoughts. It all adds up to a flight from conversation—at least from conversation that is open-ended and spontaneous, conversation in which we play with ideas, in which we allow ourselves to be fully present and vulnerable. Yet these are the conversations where empathy and intimacy flourish and social action gains strength. These are the conversations in which the creative collaborations of education and business thrive. But these conversations require time and space, and we say we’re too busy. Distracted at our dinner tables and living rooms, at our business meetings, and on our streets, we find traces of a new “silent spring”—a term Rachel Carson coined when we were ready to see that with technological change had come an assault on our environment. Now, we have arrived at another moment of recognition. This time, technology is implicated in an assault on empathy. We have learned that even a silent phone inhibits conversations that matter. The very sight of a phone on the landscape leaves us feeling less connected to each other, less invested in each other. Despite the seriousness of our moment, I write with optimism. Once aware, we can begin to rethink our practices. When we do, conversation is there to reclaim. For the failing connections of our digital world, it is the talking cure.

Excerpt from: Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age

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A Jesus Who Has Love for All Races
Sermon Discussion

 

Leading question:
When did you first realize that race was a thing, and that it had the power to divide people? (Or- when was the first time you realized that people existed in this world that were different than you?)

Luke 10:25-37.
English Standard Version (ESV)
The Parable of the Good Samaritan
25 And behold, a lawyer stood up to put him to the test, saying, “Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” 26 He said to him, “What is written in the Law? How do you read it?” 27 And he answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.” 28 And he said to him, “You have answered correctly; do this, and you will live.”

29 But he, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” 30 Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him and departed, leaving him half dead. 31 Now by chance a priest was going down that road, and when he saw him he passed by on the other side. 32 So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. 33 But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was, and when he saw him, he had compassion. 34 He went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he set him on his own animal and brought him to an inn and took care of him. 35 And the next day he took out two denarii[a] and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, ‘Take care of him, and whatever more you spend, I will repay you when I come back.’ 36 Which of these three, do you think, proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?” 37 He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” And Jesus said to him, “You go, and do likewise.”

observation questions:

what do you notice? What stands out?
What are the questions the lawyer asks Jesus?
What do you notice about the responses of the different travelers? (priest, levite, samaritan)
Why does the samaritan help the injured man? (compassion)
What does he provide for the hurt traveler? (Everything needed for restoration and healing)

interpretation questions:

Why do you think Jesus chose the characters that He did? What do those characters represent in humanity?
What do you think moved the Samaritan to have compassion on the man?
What do you think the expert in the law learned from this parable?
How does Jesus define loving your neighbor?

application questions.

What are some things that keep you from being a good neighbor? (That allow you to ignore others)

Are there certain people you find that are harder for you to love or have compassion towards? How do we grow in our compassion and love for others who seem different than us?

How do you think the church can be a place of racial healing and hope?

Towards the beginning of his sermon, Duane repented of some of the prejudices in his own heart. Do you have any prejudices to repent of? Anything to confess about hatred you might be harboring in your heart towards others?

Our privilege, our giftings, everything we have is from the Lord. How can we use those to bless and give voice to others?

Night of Hope 2.
Does racism still exist? Are people still under racial oppression today? We want to continue the conversation about race in our culture, in our country, and in our church. We are having a night to be "in process" together. Our second Night of Hope will be a night requiring grace, understanding, and honesty. We'll share stories, explore unreconciled and unrecognized wounds in our culture and society, but leave with the hope for restoration and reconciliation that only God offers through His Son.

 

Satisfied in You (Psalm 42)
The Sing Team
Ryan Leech


Have you ever experienced loss or felt despair?

Me too.

I think that is part of what makes us human in a broken world. Unfortunately, I think the Church as a whole has a hard time expressing these emotions. As a musician and worship leader in the church, I feel the pressure to convey every emotion in any given week but this one is hard. Guilt for sin? There's lots of songs for that. Repentance? Sure. Lament and sorrow for loss and tragedy in the world? That's more complicated.

Why Are You Downcast, O My Soul?

So, this past week, I introduced a new song called “Satisfied in You” by The Sing Team. It is a slow, sparce tune echoing the words of Psalm 42, a song from the Sons of Korah (who wrote many of our Psalms) that is often titled "Why Are You Downcast, O My Soul?" The psalm begins:

As a deer pants for flowing streams,
        so pants my soul for you, O God.
My soul thirsts for God,
      for the living God.
When shall I come and appear before God?
My tears have been my food
      day and night,
while they say to me all the day long,
      “Where is your God?”
Why are you cast down, O my soul?
    Why so disturbed within me?

Have you ever felt this way? When you long for God to be near when He feels so distant from you while you eat your tears day after day and night after night even as you pour your soul out?

You are not alone. The psalmist understands. I too have felt this way. Even more, Jesus knows this, has felt this, and is with you. Scripture says that when Jesus' dear friend Lazarus died, he wept (John 11). He felt the pain of loss. He felt sorrow and anguish. As he was dying on the cross, he felt the pain of losing His Father as he cried out, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" (Matthew 27).

Jesus knows very deeply what it is to feel distant from God. 

Hope in God, For You Shall Again Praise Him

The pslam ends with this:

Why are you cast down, O my soul?
    Why so disturbed within me?
Hope in God; for I shall again praise him,
    my salvation and my God.

Hope is the cure of the grief-ridden soul.

Friend, the Lord is with you. You shall again praise Him. Your safety and salvation comes from the same God who sent His Son to experience loss, sorrow, and sadness so that He may be your comfort and hope of the coming day when there will no longer be tears of sadness but tears of joy in His wonderful presence.

May this psalm and song encourage you as it has me.

May the Lord bless and keep you. May His face ever shine upon you.

Lyrics

I have lost my appetite
And a flood is welling up behind my eyes
So I eat the tears I cry
And if that were not enough
They know just the words to cut and tear and prod
When they ask me, "Whereʼs Your God?"

Why are you downcast, oh my soul?
Why so disturbed within me?
I can remember when You showed Your face to me

As a deer pants for water, so my soul thirsts for You
And when I behold Your glory, You so faithfully renew
Like a bed of rest for my fainting flesh

When Iʼm looking at the ground
Itʼs an inbred feedback loop that drags me down
So itʼs time to lift my brow
And remember better days
When I loved to worship You and learn Your ways
Singing sweetest songs of praise

Why are you downcast, oh my soul?
Why so disturbed within me?
I can remember when You showed Your grace to me

As a deer pants for water, so my soul thirsts for You
And when I survey Your splendor, You so faithfully renew
Like a bed of rest for my fainting flesh

Let my sighs give way to songs that sing about Your faithfulness
Let my pain reveal Your glory as my only real rest
Let my losses show me all I truly have is You
‘Cause all I truly have is You

So when Iʼm drowning out at sea
And all Your breakers and Your waves crash down on me
Iʼll recall Your safety scheme
Youʼre the one who made the waves
And Your Son went out to suffer in my place
And to tell me that Iʼm safe

Why am I down?
Why so disturbed?
I am satisfied in You

I am satisfied in You
I am satisfied in You
I am satisfied in You
I am satisfied in You

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A Jesus Who Reaches Out
| Luke 10:1-24 |
Sermon Discussion

Duane was hot off a trip to the Basque region, investigating possible church planting conditions in the region. While there he spent time with a lot of the locals who were amazing hosts! They were fantastic at reaching out and they're questions made him feel welcome and interesting.

What is your go to question when reaching out to get to know a new friend?

Let's read the passage:

1 After this the Lord appointed seventy-two others and sent them on ahead of him, two by two, into every town and place where he himself was about to go. 2 And he said to them, "The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few. Therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest. 3 Go your way; behold, I am sending you out as lambs in the midst of wolves. 4 Carry no moneybag, no knapsack, no sandals, and greet no one on the road. 5 Whatever house you enter, first say, 'Peace be to this house!' 6 And if a son of peace is there, your peace will rest upon him. But if not, it will return to you. 7 And remain in the same house, eating and drinking what they provide, for the laborer deserves his wages. Do not go from house to house. 8 Whenever you enter a town and they receive you, eat what is set before you. 9 Heal the sick in it and say to them, 'The kingdom of God has come near to you.' 10 But whenever you enter a town and they do not receive you, go into its streets and say, 11 'Even the dust of your town that clings to our feet we wipe off against you. Nevertheless know this, that the kingdom of God has come near.' 12 I tell you, it will be more bearable on that day for Sodom than for that town.

13 "Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago, sitting in sackcloth and ashes. 14 But it will be more bearable in the judgment for Tyre and Sidon than for you. 15 And you, Capernaum, will you be exalted to heaven? You shall be brought down to Hades.

16 "The one who hears you hears me, and the one who rejects you rejects me, and the one who rejects me rejects him who sent me."

17 The seventy-two returned with joy, saying, "Lord, even the demons are subject to us in your name!" 18 And he said to them, "I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven. 19 Behold, I have given you authority to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy, and nothing shall hurt you. 20 Nevertheless, do not rejoice in this, that the spirits are subject to you, but rejoice that your names are written in heaven."

21 In that same hour he rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, "I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to little children; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. 22 All things have been handed over to me by my Father, and no one knows who the Son is except the Father, or who the Father is except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him." 23 Then turning to the disciples he said privately, "Blessed are the eyes that see what you see! 24 For I tell you that many prophets and kings desired to see what you see, and did not see it, and to hear what you hear, and did not hear it."

The passage tells of Jesus reaching out by sending out the 72 disciples, and God reaching out to us by sending Jesus.
Duane had 3 points that he wanted to discuss:

- The work and the workers
- The receptive and resistant
- The justice and the joy

THE WORK AND THE WORKERS

In verse 2 Jesus invites laborers into his work, to bring in the harvest. Duane explained that Jesus sent the disciples everywhere, and possibly the 72 disciples were to represent the 72 countries that were recognized at the point in history. He also mentioned that harvests can take a long time to come to fruition, involve quite a bit of financial risk, and have to be done intentionally without getting distracted.

How do you think the act of harvesting relates to the work Jesus has asked us to do in San Diego?

Why do you think God invited us into this work?

What are some things that keep you from getting your hands dirty with the work?

Duane mentioned that the call for workers in verse 2 can bring out 3 different feelings in people

- Some are inspired to get to work
- Some are affirmed in their current work
- Some feel convicted that they should get to work

How does this call for workers effect you?

THE RECEPTIVE AND RESISTANT

Jesus points out in verse 3 that this work is not without risk. There are wolves out there looking to harm you. In verse 5 he continues His instructions telling them to look for "Sons of Peace" who are open to the news and if they find no one open to move on.

Have you ever met a "Son of Peace" Someone who's heart is ready and open to the kingdom message?

What dangers do we face reaching out in San Diego?

Jesus provides a wide spectrum of how people will respond to the 72 from open and receptive to doing His work or resistant, critical, or distracted?

Where are you on the spectrum to being used by God?

THE JUSTICE AND THE JOY

Jesus then explains in verse 13-15, that those who do not believe will end up in hell. Those that believe have their names joyously written in the book of life and will go to heaven. Duane explained that heaven and hell are both real places. And God would be just to send all of us to hell, but through his grace and Jesus work we are made right and able to enter heaven. Jesus then explains to the disciples how great a privilege that they were able to see these works with their own eyes, that Kings and Prophets had desired to see it but could not.

Why would God be just in sending all people to hell?

Why do you think God revealed these things to us and these simple disciples instead of great Kings and Prophets?

God is excited to bring people into His family, it's why He reached out by sending Jesus.

Do you think of God as reaching out to you?

How has God been reaching out to you lately? Trying to get to know you and share Himself with you?

PRAYER
Pray with your group, thanking God for reaching out and inviting us into His family. And asking God to spur us towards laboring on His harvest in San Diego

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Donation Sundays

October 8 & 15

The Resolved Church is hosting Donation Sundays October 8 and 15 where we encourage you to bring clothing, hygiene products, and nonperishable food items so we can create a resource closet to provide for the needs of homeless people and trafficking victims in San Diego.

1 John 3:17-18 says, "If anyone has material possessions and sees his brother in need but has no pity on him, how can the love of God be in him? Dear children, let us not love with words or tongue but with actions and in truth."

Let us give from our abundance and pray that through our generosity we will be presented opportunities to lead souls to the ultimate Provider. Keep in mind, aiding in the prevention and rehabilitation of homelessness makes a huge impact in decreasing human trafficking.

If you are interested in donating your time and talents email

Here are some things we need:

Clean Clothing:

Socks (new only)
Underwear (new only)
Shoes
Jackets
Shirts
Pants
Gloves
Beanies

Hygiene:

Antibacterial Ointment
Fungal Cream
Blister Pads
Band Aids
Nail Clippers
Chapstick
Hand Sanitizer
Toothbrush
Toothbrush Travel Cases
Travel Sized Toothpaste
Wipes
Tampons
Pads
Tissues
Paper towels
Toilet Paper
Deodorant
Brush/Comb
Disinfectant Wipes
Sun Screen

Non-Perishable Food:

Water
Canned Fish
Canned Beans
Canned Tomatoes
Canned Prunes
Canned Chili
Canned Spinach
Canned Figs
Canned Lentils
Canned Clams
Canned Vegetables
Granola/Breakfast Bars
Dried Fruit
Dessert
Reusable Plastic Utensils

Miscellaneous:

Gift Cards
Birthdays and Christmas Gifts

Donate Skills:

Resume Writing
Tutoring
Cooking Lessons
Life Coach
Legal Services
Budgeting
Transportation
Anti-Trafficking Services